Harvard architecture

From Academic Kids

The term Harvard architecture originally referred to computer architectures that used physically separate storage and signal pathways for their instructions and data (in contrast to the von Neumann architecture). The term originated from the Harvard Mark I relay-based computer, which stored instructions on punched tape and data in relay latches. These early machines had very limited data storage, entirely contained within the data processing unit, and provided no access to the instruction storage as data (making loading, modifying, etc. of programs entirely an offline process).

In a computer with a von Neumann architecture, the CPU can be either reading an instruction or reading/writing data from/to the memory. Both cannot occur at the same time since the instructions and data use the same signal pathways and memory. In a computer with Harvard architecture, the CPU can read both an instruction and data from memory at the same time. A computer with Harvard architecture can be faster because it is able to fetch the next instruction at the same time it completes the current instruction. Speed is gained at the expense of more complex electrical circuitry.

In recent years the speed of the CPU has grown many times in comparison to the access speed of the main memory. Care needs to be taken to reduce the number of times main memory is accessed in order to maintain performance. If, for instance, every instruction run in the CPU requires an access to memory, the computer gains nothing for increased CPU speed - a problem referred to as being memory bound.

Memory can be made much faster, but only at high cost. The solution then is to provide a small amount of very fast memory known as a cache. As long as the memory the CPU needs is in the cache, the performance hit is very much less than it is if the cache then has to turn around and get the data from the main memory. Tuning the cache is an important aspect of computer design.

Modern high performance CPU chip designs incorporate aspects of both Harvard and von Neumann architecture. On chip cache memory is divided into an instruction cache and a data cache. Harvard architecture is used as the CPU accesses the cache. In the case of a cache miss, however, the data is retrieved from the main memory, which is not divided into separate instruction and data sections. Thus a von Neumann architecture is used for off chip memory access.

Harvard architectures are also frequently used in specialized DSPs, or digital signal processors, commonly used in audio or video processing products. Example, Blackfin processors by Analog Devices Inc (http://www.analog.com/) make use of a Harvard architecture.

Additionally, most general purpose small microcontrollers used in several electronics applications, such as the PIC microcontrollers made by Microchip Technology Inc (http://www.microchip.com/), are based on the Harvard architecture. These processors are characterized by having small amounts of program and data memory, and take advantage of the Harvard architecture and reduced instruction set to ensure that most instructions can be executed within only one machine cycle.de:Harvard-Architektur es:Arquitectura Harvard uk:Гарвардська архітектура zh:哈佛结构

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